Taking advantage of the beautiful weather, we retreated from the smog of the city to the stunning Derbyshire dales with a visit to breathtaking Chatsworth House.

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Chatsworth House is a stately home in the county of Derbyshire in the East Midlands region of England.  It is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire, and has been home to his family, the Cavendish family, since Bess of Hardwick settled at Chatsworth in 1549.

Standing on the east bank of the River Derwent, Chatsworth looks across to the low hills that divide the Derwent and Wye valleys. The house, set in expansive parkland and backed by wooded, rocky hills rising to heather moorland, contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculptures, books and other artefacts. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom’s favourite country house several times.

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Chatsworth has 126 rooms, with nearly 100 of them closed to visitors. The house is well-adapted to allow the family to live privately in their apartments while the house is open to the public. Deborah, Dowager Duchess of Devonshire describes the family rooms in detail in her book Chatsworth: The House. She now lives at Edensor and the present (12th) Duke and Duchess have moved into Chatsworth. The family occupies rooms on the ground and first floors of the south front, all three floors of the west front, and the upper two floors of the north front. Staircases in the northeast corner of the main block and in a turret in the east front enable them to move about without crossing the public route.

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The Library- apparently this room is a focus at Christmas decorated to perfection.  Although not in the photograph there is a beautiful baby grand piano and visitors are invited to play.

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The main dining area set for service and decorated in ornate silver tableware.

 

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The main staricase

 

A beautiful screen in one of the guest bedrooms- which matched  the

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bespoke handpainted wallpaper.  The wallpaper feautred sprawling vines peppered with exotic birds flora and fauna.  A true highlight.

 

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One of the guest beds – this bedroom featured a panoramic view of the canal pond and giant water feature.

 

 

I loved these haning candles.  Backed with mirror, hanging from red rope from the lofty ceiling and spread across the walls of the room – not only would they have been innovative pre electricity but would have created a beautiful effect.  The tapestry of woodland landscapes – one of many- was breathtaking also.

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An image of the Music Room- an ornate study.  Marble topped tables parquet floors and silk backed regency chairs in abundance.  The room gets it name due to the hanging violin on the door- which in fact is a Trompe L’oeil painting from the 1700s by Dutch artist Jan Van Der Vaart!

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The chapel featured a bronze sculpture Saint Bartholemew: Exquisite Pain’  by Damain Hirst depicting the saint who was skinned alive.  He stands anatomically exposed and carrying his perfectly removed skin.

This is on exhibit as part of Sotheby’s semi permanent installation named ‘Beyond Limits’ which features a catalogue of contemporary artists work ingratiated amongst the house amd grounds.

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Finely haindpainted Ostrich Eggs on display

 

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Beautiful vases

A Salon Hang in the back stairwell of Old Master portraits.  Beyond this room on display were some stunning Rembrandt drawings also.

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Hunting rifles and duelling pistols on display

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A rather unusal buggy, of Russian origin.

 

 

 

 

 

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Sculptures adorning the gardens

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The wild english country garden walled in by a hedged maze.

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An exterior angle with gold leaf windowframes that dazzled in the sunshine